SANU(Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts)

The name of the Academy was officially introduced by the Law of November 1, 1886, but it was not the actual beginning of the Academy's work in Serbia. The formal founding of the Serbian Royal Academy was only one of the turning points in the development of learned societies in Serbia. The Academy inherited the property of the Serbian Learned Society and continued its work. Finally, in 1892 when the two institutions merged the Academy accepted the members of the Serbian Learned Society as its own either regular or honorary members. The Serbian Learned Society (1864-1892) was, however, only the short-term extension of the suspended Society of Serbian Letters (1841-1864). Thus, the development of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts cannot be presented without the learned societies that preceded it and from which it originated. ENDOWMENTS and FUNDS have also enormous importance for life and development of the Academy.

 

Presidents:

Josif Pančić (1887-1888) 
Čedomilj Mijatović (1888-1889) 
Dimitrije Nešić (1892-1895) 
Milan Đ. Milićević (1896-1899) 
Jovan Ristić (1899) 
Sima Lozanić (1899-1900) 
Jovan Mišković (1900-1903) 
Sima Lozanić (1903-1906) 
Stojan Novaković (1906-1915) 
Jovan Žujović (1915-1921) 
Jovan Cvijić (1921-1827) 
Slobodan Jovanović (1928-1931) 
Bogdan Gavrilović (1931-1937) 
Aleksandar Belić (1937-1960) 
Ilija Đuričić (1960-1965) 
Velibor Gligorić (1965-1971) 
Pavle Savić (1971-1981) 
Dušan Kanazir (1981-1994) 
Aleksandar Despić (1994-1998) 
Dejan Medaković (1999-2003) 
Nikola Hajdin (2003 - present )

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He was a Serbian architect and academician of SASA and Professor of Architecture, one of the best architects in post-war Yugoslavia.

He studied architecture in Belgrade from 1945 to 1950. He first worked in Jugoprojekt, and in 1957 he started working in the Faculty of Architecture in Belgrade, first as an assistant and since 1973 as a full professor. He was a corresponding member of the Serbian Academy of Sciences since 1976 and full time since 1983. His works are characterized by precision and clear illustrations.

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Ivan Antić (Belgrade, 3 December 1923 - Belgrade, 25 November 2005)
Date of birth: 
Monday, December 3, 1923
Place of birth and location: 
Београд
Serbia
44° 49' 0.0012" N, 20° 28' 0.0012" E
Date of death: 
Friday, November 25, 2005
Place of death and location : 
Београд
Serbia
44° 49' 0.0012" N, 20° 28' 0.0012" E
Gender: 
Мушки
Year of birth: 
1923
Country of Birth: 
Serbia
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Rosandić was born in Split on the Dalmatian coast, the son of a stoneworker. His family name, Rosandić originates from Podgora a small coastal village in Southern Dalmatia about 70 km south of Split. During the early years in Split, Rosandić learnt to carve in wood as well as stone and was much inspired by the younger Meštrović who had moved there from Otavice. Both sculptors studied overseas before returning to Split, Rosandić touring Italy and exhibiting in Milan in 1906 and Belgrade in 1912.
Statue of Stone Thrower, (1935), National Museum of Serbia

Something of their parallel development and underlying rivalry can be understood from their respective projects to combine sculpture and architecture. Both constructed a mausoleum, Rosandić for the Petrinović family (Supetar, on the island of Brač off Split) and Meštrović to the Račić family (Cavtat, south of Dubrovnik). Each exhibit the influence of Dalmatian history, but while Meštrović's mausoleum is based on the principle of simplicity, Rosandić richly ornamented his building with a blend of Gothic and Renaissance motifs to express a more national character.

With the outbreak of World War I, Rosandić left for London where he exhibited at the Grafton Galleries in 1917 and later in Brighton and Edinburgh. During World War II, Rosandić settled in Belgrade. He was interned by the German occupation forces during the war, but was later released through the intervention of Dragomir Jovanović. Rosandić later testified at the Belgrade Process.

He founded a prominent school in Belgrade known as the "Master Workshop". Amongst the many artists and public personalities that frequented the workshop was Henry Moore, during his exhibition in Belgrade in March 1955.In his maturity, Rosandić executed two of his greatest masterpieces: the pair of stone statues of a man struggling with a horse, which flank the entrance to the Federal Parliament building in Belgrade (today Parliament of Serbia), and a massive stone frieze of figures for a monument in Subotica, Vojvodina, Serbia (1952). Many of his bronze projects at this time were cast in the Voždovac foundry and other works by his hand can be found at the Toma Rosandić Memorial Museum and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Belgrade. He returned to his beloved Split before his death in 1958.

 

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Toma Rosandić (Baptized as Tomaso Vincenzo, January 22, 1878 - March 1, 1958) was a sculptor from Split, Croatia. Together with Ivan Meštrović (1883-1962), he was the most prominent of the Croatian sculptors of his day.
Date of birth: 
Tuesday, January 22, 1878
Place of birth and location: 
Split
Croatia
43° 30' 43.452" N, 16° 27' 22.1256" E
Date of death: 
Saturday, March 1, 1958
Place of death and location : 
Split
Croatia
43° 30' 38.358" N, 16° 27' 7.2936" E
Gender: 
Мушки
Year of birth: 
1958
Country of Birth: 
Croatia
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Born in Ćuprija, educated in France - Grenoble and Nice. Started Faculty of Philosophy  in Paris, finished it in Belgrade. As a young man, he survived retreat through Albania! He was an associate in the avant-garde magazines "Zenit" and "Roads". His first solo book, a collection of essays, "One aspect of French literature" (1952), released at his age of 54. The first book of poetry, "Bagdala" (1954), when he was 56. He became a corresponding member of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts (SANU) on December 16, 1965, and a regular member on 28th of May in 1970.

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У његовом родном граду. Песник, мислилац, преводилац, романсијер, есејиста и прозаиста, један од покретача надреализма у српској књижевности. У Ћупријском музеју постоји соба Душана Матића препуна личних предмета великог песника.
 

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The poet, scholar, interpreter, novelist, essayist and prose writer, one of the founders of surrealism in Serbian literature. (Ćuprija, August 31, 1898 - Belgrade, 12 September 1980)
Date of birth: 
Wednesday, August 31, 1898
Place of birth and location: 
Ćuprija
Serbia
43° 55' 59.9988" N, 21° 22' 0.0012" E
Date of death: 
Friday, September 12, 1980
Place of death and location : 
Beograd
Serbia
44° 49' 0.0012" N, 20° 28' 0.0012" E
Gender: 
Мушки
Epoch: 
Year of birth: 
1898
Country of Birth: 
Serbia
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Sekulić was born in Mošorin, Bačka, in what is now the Serbian province of Vojvodina. Apart from her studies in literature, Sekulić was also well versed in natural sciences as well as philosophy. She graduated from the pedagogical school in Budapest in 1892, and obtained her doctorate in 1922 in Germany. Her travels included extended stays in England, France and Norway. Her travels from Oslo through Bergen to Finnmark resulted in Pisma iz Norveške / Letters from Norway meditative travelogue in 1914. Her collection of short stories, Saputnici, are unusually detailed and penetrating accomplishment in self-analysis and a brave stylistic experiment. She also spoke several classical as well as nine modern languages.

Sekulić's lyrical, meditative, introspective and analytical writings come at the dawn of Serbian prose writing. Sekulić is concerned with the human condition of man in his new, thoroughly modern sensibility. In her main novel, The Chronicle of a Small Town Cemetery (Кроника паланачког гробља), she writes in opposition to the usual chronological development of events. Instead, each part of the book begins in the cemetery, eventually returning to the time of bustling life, with all its joys and tragedies. Characters such as Gospa Nola, are the first strong female characters in Serbian literature, painted in detail in all their courage, pride and determination.

Isidora Sekulić also wrote critical writings in the areas of music, theatre, art, architecture and literature and philosophy. She wrote major studies of Yugoslav, Russian, English, German, French, Italian, Norwegian and other literatures.

Isidora Sekulić, Književni pogledi Isidore Sekulić (The Literary Views of Isidora Sekulić) Belgrade, Prosveta, 1986.

 

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Isidora Sekulić (Serbian Cyrillic: Исидора Секулић, 16 February 1877 – 5 April 1958) was a Serbian prose writer, novelist, essayist, adventurer, polyglot and art critic.
Date of birth: 
Friday, February 16, 1877
Place of birth and location: 
Mašorin
Serbia
45° 17' 60" N, 20° 10' 0.0012" E
Date of death: 
Saturday, April 5, 1958
Place of death and location : 
Beograd
Serbia
44° 49' 0.0012" N, 20° 28' 0.0012" E
Gender: 
Женски
Year of birth: 
1877
Country of Birth: 
Serbia
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 His work embodies central characteristics of Roman Catholic Counter-Reformation: religious fervor, insistence on "vanity of this world" and zeal in opposition to "infidels." Gundulić's major works—the epic poem Osman, the pastoral play Dubravka, and the religious poem Tears of the Prodigal Son (based on the Parable of the Prodigal Son) are examples of Baroque stylistic richness and, frequently, rhetorical excess.Gundulić was born in Dubrovnik into a wealthy Ragusan noble family (see House of Gundulić) on 8 January 1589. Son of Francesco di Francesco Gundulić (senator and diplomat, once the Ragusan envoy to Constantinople and councilor of the Republic to the Pope Gregory VIII) and Djiva Gradic (de Gradi). He received an excellent education. He probably studied the humanities with the Jesuit Silvestro Muzio and philosophy with Ridolfo Ricasoli and Camillo Camilli (*Siena -+1615),[2] who in late 1590 had been appointed rettore delle scuole e professore di umane lettere in Ragusa. After that he studied Roman law and jurisprudence in general, where he held numerous offices for the Great Council of the Republic. In 1608, when he was nineteen, he became a member of the Veliko vieće (Great Council). Twice, in 1615 and 1619, he held the temporary function of knez (commissary or governor) of Konavle, an area southeast of the city.

At the age of thirty he married with Nicoleta Sorkočević (Sorgo)(+1644) who bore him three sons, Frano (Francesco), Matheo (Mato), Šiško (Segismondo) and two daughters, Maria (Mara) Gondola and Dziva (Giovanna). Fran Dživo Gundulić and Mato Gundulić (1636–1684) fought in the thirty-years war under Wallenstein; the youngest died on January 16, 1682, being by then the Rector of the Republic. From 1621 until his death Ivan held various offices in the city government. In 1636 he became a senator, in 1637 a judge, and in 1638 a member of the Small Council (Malo vieće). Had he lived a little longer – he died of an intense fever, product of an inflammation in his ribs ( Folio 15 Libr. Mort. N°274, Adi le Xbre 1638 Ragusa) – he would probably have been elected knez of the Dubrovnik Republic, the highest function that was held for one month only by meritorious gentlemen at least fifty years old. His father, who died in 1624, had been knez five times, and Ivan's son Šišmundo Gundulić later four times. He began his literary career by writing poems and staging melodramas that became popular in Dubrovnik. But Ivan published only his larger works. His earlier work, which he referred to as a "brood of darkness", is now lost. His first publications were in 1621, when he rewrote several of David's Psalms and wrote several religious poems. He then wrote his famous Suze sina razmetnoga (Tears of the Prodigal Son) in 1622, composed of three "Cries": Sagriešenje (Sin), Spoznanje (Insight) and Skrušenje (Humility). In this poem Ivan presented the three basic categories of Christian faith: sin, repentance and redemption through contrasts such as between life and death, purity and sin, and Heaven and Hell. In 1637 when Ferdinand II of Tuscany married, Gundulić wrote a poem to honor the event, he noted that "all of Slavic people (Slovinski narod) honor you on this occasion".

 

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Dživo
Personal information: 
Đivo Franov Gundulić (Serbo-Croatian pronunciation; also Gianfrancesco Gondola; 8 January 1589 – 8 December 1638; Nickname: Mačica), better known today as Ivan Gundulić, was the most prominent Croatian Baroque poet from the Republic of Ragusa.
Date of birth: 
Tuesday, January 9, 1589
Place of birth and location: 
Dubrovnik
Croatia
42° 39' 2.3796" N, 18° 5' 39.9264" E
Date of death: 
Wednesday, December 8, 1638
Place of death and location : 
Dubrovnik
Croatia
42° 39' 2.3796" N, 18° 5' 39.9264" E
Gender: 
Мушки
Year of birth: 
1589
Country of Birth: 
Croacia
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Kiš was influenced by Bruno Schulz, Vladimir Nabokov, Jorge Luis Borges, Ivo Andrić and Miroslav Krleža,[2] among other authors. His most famous works include A Tomb for Boris Davidovich and The Encyclopedia of the Dead.Kiš was born in Subotica, Danube Banovina, Kingdom of Yugoslavia (now Serbia). He was the son of Eduard Kiš (Hungarian: Kis Ede), a Hungarian-speaking Jewish railway inspector, and Milica (née Dragićević) from Cetinje (now Montenegro). His father was born in Austria-Hungary with the surname Kon, but changed it to Kis as part of Magyarization, a widely implemented practice at the time. During the Second World War, Danilo's father along with several other family members, were killed in various Nazi camps. His mother took him and his older sister Danica to Hungary for the duration of the war. After the end of the war, the family moved to Cetinje, Yugoslavia, where Kiš graduated from high school in 1954.

Kiš studied literature at the University of Belgrade, and graduated in 1958 as the first student to be awarded a degree in comparative literature. He was a prominent member of the Vidici magazine, where he worked until 1960. In 1962 he published his first two novels, Mansarda and Psalam 44. For his 1973 novel Peščanik (Hourglass), Kiš received the prestigious NIN Award, but returned it a few years later due to a political dispute. During the following years, he received an array of national and international awards for his prose and poetry.

Kiš lived in Belgrade until the last decade of his life, when he lived in Paris as well Belgrade. For a number of years he worked as a lecturer elsewhere in France. He was married to Mirjana Miočinović from 1962 to 1981. After their separation, he lived with Pascale Delpech until his early death from lung cancer in Paris.

A film based on Peščanik (Fövenyóra), directed by the Hungarian Szabolcs Tolnai, was finished in 2008. In May 1989, with his friend, director Aleksandar Mandić, Kiš made the four-episode TV series Goli Život about the lives of two Jewish women. The shooting took place in Israel. The program was broadcast after his death, in the spring of 1990. This was the last work by Kiš.

Kiš's work was translated into English only in piecemeal fashion, and many of his important books weren't available in English translations until the 2010s, when Dalkey Archive began releasing a selection of titles, including A Tomb for Boris Davidovich and Garden, Ashes; in 2012, Dalkey released The Attic, Psalm 44, and the posthumous collection of stories The Lute and the Scars, capably translated by John K. Cox. These publications completed the process of "the Englishing of Kiš's fiction", allowing the possibility of what Pete Mitchell of Booktrust called a resurrection of Kiš.Kiš was influenced especially by Jorge Luis Borges: he had been accused of plagiarizing Borges (and James Joyce) in A Tomb for Boris Davidovich, which prompted a "scathing response" in The Anatomy Lesson (1978),[8] and the influence of Borges is recognized in The Encyclopedia of the Dead. From Bruno Schulz, the Polish writer and prose stylist, Kiš picked up "mythic elements" for The Encyclopedia of the Dead, and he reportedly told John Updike that "Schulz is my God".

Branko Gorjup sees two distinct periods in Kiš's career as a novelist. The first, which includes Psalm 44, Garden, Ashes, and Early Sorrows, is marked by realism: Kiš creates characters whose psychology "reflect the external world of the writer's memories, dreams, and nightmares, or his experiences of the time and space in which he lives". The worlds he constructed in his narratives, while he distanced himself from pure mimesis, were still constructed to be believable. The separation from mimesis he sought to achieve by a kind of deception through language, a process intended to instill "'doubts' and 'trepidations' associated with a child's growing pains and early sorrows. The success of this 'deception' depended upon the effect of 'recognition' on the part of the reader". The point, for Kiš, was to make the reader accept "the illusion of a created reality".

In those early novels, Kiš still employed traditional narrators and his plots unfolded chronologically, but in later novels, beginning with Hourglass (the third volume of the "Family Cycle", after Garden, Ashes and Early Sorrows), his narrative techniques changed considerably and traditional plotlines were no longer followed. The role of the narrator was strongly reduced, and perspective and plot were fragmented: in Hourglass, which in Eduard Scham portrayed a father figure resembling the author's, "at least four different Schams with four separate personalities" were presented, each based on documentary evidence. This focus on the manipulation and selection of supposed documentary evidence is a hallmark of Kiš's later period, and underlies the method of A Tomb for Boris Davidovich, according to Branko Garjup:

First, most of the plots in the work are derived or borrowed from already-existing sources of varied literary significance, some easily recognizable—for example, those extracted from Roy Medvedev and Karl Steiner—while others are more obscure. Second, Kiš employs the technique of textual transposition, whereby entire sections or series of fragments, often in their unaltered state, are taken from other texts and freely integrated into the fabric of his work.

This documentary style places Kiš's later work in what he himself called a post-Borges period, but unlike Borges the documentation comes from "historically and politically relevant material", which in A Tomb for Boris Davidovich is used to denounce Stalinism. Unlike Borges, Kiš is not interested in metaphysics, but in "more ordinary phenomena"; in the title story of The Encyclopedia of the Dead, this means building an encyclopedia "containing the biography of every ordinary life lived since 1789".

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Danilo Kiš (Serbian Cyrillic: Данило Киш; 22 February 1935 – 15 October 1989) was a Yugoslav novelist, short story writer and poet who wrote in Serbo-Croatian, member of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts.
Date of birth: 
Friday, February 22, 1935
Place of birth and location: 
Subotica
Serbia
46° 6' 1.0008" N, 19° 39' 56.0016" E
Date of death: 
Sunday, October 15, 1989
Place of death and location : 
Pariz
Serbia
48° 51' 16.4844" N, 2° 21' 31.482" E
Gender: 
Мушки
Year of birth: 
1935
Country of Birth: 
Serbia
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He was born in Smriječno village near Plužine, then in the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes. He was a Belgrade Law School graduate and a professor of philosophy at the University of Belgrade Faculty of Philosophy as well as a member of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts. His father Pavle Tadić was a lieutenant of the Montenegrin Army in the wars against the Ottomans. Pavle opened the first school in Piva, during the Kingdom of Yugoslavia.

Tadić was one of the founders of the Democratic Party (DS) in Serbia in December 1989. He was one of the leaders of the pro-European movement in Serbia. Tadić was of the Piva Herzegovinian clan.

Tadić was married to psychiatrist Nevenka Tadić and had two children. His son Boris Tadić served as the President of Serbia from 2004 to 2012. Ljuba Tadić died in Belgrade, Serbia, aged 88.

 

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Ljubomir Tadić (14 May 1925 – 31 December 2013) was a Serbian academic and politician.
Date of birth: 
Thursday, May 14, 1925
Place of birth and location: 
Plužina
Montenegro
43° 9' 14.8932" N, 18° 50' 27.7368" E
Date of death: 
Thursday, October 31, 2013
Place of death and location : 
Beograd
Serbia
44° 49' 0.0012" N, 20° 28' 0.0012" E
Gender: 
Мушки
Year of birth: 
1925
Country of Birth: 
Montenegro
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Born in Tuzla, Bosnia, Ljuba studied Fine Arts in Belgrade but was shocked by the discovery of 1959 exhibition of surrealist art from the Urvater collection. In 1960, he founded the movement ‘Mediala’, meaning ‘Honey and Dragon’, to express both the concepts of desire and fear. Ljuba arrives in Paris in 1963 and is immediately taken in by French galerists and surrealists. Living in Paris and supported by Thessa Herold’s gallery, Ljuba paints fantastical paintings, full of disturbing and desirable creatures, reminiscent of Dali’s work, according to Mandiargue’s review in 1970. Inspired by a mixture of Renaissance and Baroque painting, as well as his grandfather’s exorcisms, Ljuba’s works teems with the demons of a dark pessimism. (Les Peintres Surrealistes, Sarane Alexandrian, p.58-59).

He is the subject of the short documentary film L'amour monstre de tous les temps (1978) by Walerian Borowczyk. He was member of SANU.

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Ljuba
Personal information: 
Ljubomir Popović (born 14 October 1934) is a Serbian surrealist painter. He considers himself to be Serbian born in Yugoslavia. He is renowned for his many erotic and unconventionally juxtaposed subject matters.
Date of birth: 
Sunday, October 14, 1934
Place of birth and location: 
Tuzla
Bosnia and Herzegovina
44° 31' 31.2456" N, 18° 41' 25.7676" E
Gender: 
Мушки
Epoch: 
Year of birth: 
1934
Country of Birth: 
Bosna i Hercegovina
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Studied painting and drawing in the Serbian painter's and draughtsman's school of Kyril Kutlik, and later Beta Vukanović. In 1905. enrolls private painting school of Anton Ažbe, and in the same year the Kunstgewerbeschule in Munich.

After his return to the homeland, he was, first, appointed as a teacher in a grammar school, and later a professor of drawing in the Arts and Crafts School in Belgrade. He was a teacher at the Academy of Fine Arts in Belgrade from 1940 to 1945 as a full-time professor of printmaking.

Travels through the country and abroad, and makes drawings which were published in several specially edited albums. He was a member of "Lada" artist's group.

In 1922 he became a member of Serbian royal academy (later Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts).

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Ljubomir Ivanović (1882–1954) was a Serbian printmaker and draughtsman.
Date of birth: 
Sunday, February 12, 1882
Place of birth and location: 
Beograd
Serbia
44° 48' 9.864" N, 20° 28' 42.6576" E
Date of death: 
Friday, November 23, 1945
Place of death and location : 
Beograd
Serbia
44° 48' 31.3164" N, 20° 27' 58.1616" E
Gender: 
Мушки
Year of birth: 
1882
Country of Birth: 
Serbia
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Stevan Sremac was born in Senta in Bačka region (then part of the Austrian Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar) on 11 November 1855. He spent his early childhood in the city of his birth, and moved to Belgrade to study after his parents died. While still a university student, he joined the Serbian Army and participated in the 1876 and 1877–1878 wars as a volunteer. In 1878 he graduated from Belgrade's Grande École (Velika škola) in philosophy and history. He became a teacher, working in this profession for the rest of his life—in the southern Serbia's cities of Pirot, Niš and Belgrade. His personal relations with his pupils were of singularly close and affectionate nature, and the charm of his social gifts and genial character won him friends on all sides. His literary reputation was established relatively late, in 1890, with novelized chronicles of events and personages from Serbian history. These weren't published until 1903 under title Iz knjiga starostavnih ("From Ancient Books").

In political sense, he was an activist of Liberal party (Serbia), which was pretty conservative with strong nationalist sentiments and supported the rule of Obrenović dynasty.

Sremac's period spent in Niš was his most productive period. During that period, he published Božićna pečenica (1893), Ivkova slava (1895), Vukadin (1903), Limunacija na selu (1896), Pop Ćira i pop Spira (1898), Čiča Jordan (1903), and Zona Zamfirova (1906), all characterized with local colouring, realism, humour, and satire. Because of their high dramatic quality, many of these were later dramatized, with Ivkova slava, being the most successful. Sremac's characters are usually small merchants, clerks, priests, artists, and just simple folk in small Serbian towns. A realist and sharp observer, he was able to point out the changes sweeping Serbian society into a new era. Some of his stories dealing with vanishing way of life that had persisted for centuries have an unforegetable nostalgic flavor. His depiction of the patriarchal atmosphere of Serbia of his time is done in a humorous vain, but never mockingly, except when he ridicules his political opponents. Sremac's short stories reveal his love for the slowly disappearing "old way" of life. The plots are placed in his native Vojvodina, Bačka in particular, Belgrade, and mostly, southern parts of Serbia. But it is his humor for which Sremac is best known and remembered.

Many of his works were turned into films; his most popular novel Pop Ćira i pop Spira was made into TV series in 1980s, while feature films Zona Zamfirova (2002) and Ivkova slava (2005), both by director Zdravko Šotra saw huge success in Serbia and Montenegro.

Sremac died accidentally of blood poisoning in Sokobanja on 12. August 1906

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Sremac died accidentally of blood poisoning in Sokobanja on 12. August 1906

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Stevan Sremac was a Serbian realist and comedy writer. He is considered one of the best truly humorous Serbian writers. (23. November 1855 – 25. August 1906)
Date of birth: 
Friday, November 23, 1855
Place of birth and location: 
Senta
Serbia
45° 55' 59.9988" N, 20° 4' 59.9988" E
Date of death: 
Saturday, August 25, 1906
Place of death and location : 
Sokabanja
Serbia
43° 38' 60" N, 21° 52' 0.0012" E
Gender: 
Мушки
Epoch: 
Year of birth: 
1855
Country of Birth: 
Serbia

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